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Deck Review Thread (Experienced Players Wanted For Reviews! See Details)


pokemasterTz

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LOL, anything will work. If I am allowed just to comment on Virgen     Well certainly I was able to create a very good, "BROKEN" Deck out of a similar concept of Vir-Gen, it didn't work exactly b

“Chopping Evolution”  A Look At The Ascent Of Archeops!   The idea of stopping evolution is, in theory, very strong. So when Archeops was first released, why was it never played? Well, it seems that

You are welcome.

 

 

 

 

“Chopping Evolution” A Look At The Ascent Of Archeops!

 

 

The idea of stopping evolution is, in theory, very strong. So when Archeops was first released, why was it never played? Well, it seems that the Pokémon Company really hates Archeops. First of all, you must realize, at the time Archeops was released, evolution was huge. Archeops would have been amazing! If it didn’t have all those flaws. Yeah………. Starting off the list of Archeops problems is the fact that it is a fossil Pokémon. Fossil Pokémon have a long, bad history involving the difficulty of getting those cards into play. The Jaw fossil and Archen that were needed were just too hard of a combo to pull off. Second of all, the set Archeops was released In was also the set where an old mechanic was re-introduced: EX Pokémon. Because of EX cards, much of the format became less reliant on evolution and more on these basic Pokémon. Archeops was both hard to set up being a stage 1 fossil Pokémon, and not as useful as it could have been. So it slowly sank to the bottom.

 

 

 

Maxie’s Revival; Brining Archeops Back From Rock Bottom

 

 

Sets went by, and soon Primal Clash came along. With it, two interesting came out; Archie’s Ace In The Hole, and Maxie’s Hidden Ball Trick. Now, as most of you know, Maxie’s has a spectacular combo with Archeops. With Maxie’s, it is no longer hard to set up Archeops, as without the need for that dreaded Jaw Fossil, it gets pretty easy. For those of you who do not know what Maxie’s does, it brings back ANY fighting type Pokémon from your discard pile straight onto your bench if it is the last card in your hand. Then, it lets you draw five cards. What’s more, the format by this time had shifted again, and evolution was being used more and more. With the introduction of Mega Evolution, Archeops only got stronger. So why is the price of Archeops skyrocketing now? Well, although Maxie’s allowed Archeops to work as soon as it was released, in the end, the answer came down to this; No one cared. The expanded format was not played nearly as much as the standard format, and it did not really matter to most people. It was not used in any big tournaments, and was kind of just there. So, with Archeops being in expanded, it seemed it would stay at the bottom. But I wouldn’t be writing an article about that would I? There was something big that lead to the price of SR Archeops rising in price. That, was the announcement that all regional tournaments will be held in the expanded format. Regionals, are huge, so this significantly increases the ability of Archeops. What’s more, Archeops is being used more and more in the PTCGO, as a large percentage of players are also so IRL. With this Archeops rises, so let’s take a look at a couple decks.

 

 

 

Partners For Archeops; A Look At Four Lists

 

 

To start, let’s look at a skeleton Archeops list with a few staple cards thrown in:

 

Pokémon: 2

 

2 Archeops

 

Trainers: 17

 

2 Battle Compressor

 

2 Maxie’s Hidden Ball Trick

 

4 Ultra Ball

 

4 VS Seeker

 

4 Professor Sycamore

 

1 N

 

Energy:

 

N/A

 

Total: 19

 

Okay, so with those 19 cards, let’s look at some lists.

 

 

 

1) Archeops/Night March

 

2) Archeops/Yvetal

 

3) Archeops/Seismitoad

 

4) Archeops Pyroar

 

 

 

To start things off, we have Night March. If you think about it, this makes a ton of sense. Night March already runs four compressor, and it does not have any evolutions that can be blocked by Archeops, and it has the room. Here is a list;

 

Pokemon: 20

 

3 Shaymin EX

 

4 Joltik

 

4 Pumpkaboo Pies (No Pumpkaboos were harmed in the making of these pies)

 

4 Lampent

 

2 Archeops

 

3 Mew EX

 

Trainers: 33

 

4 Battle Compressor

 

4 Ultra Ball

 

3 Trainers Mail

 

1 Super Rod

 

3 Dimension Valley

 

4 Professor Sycamore

 

1 N

 

4 VS Seeker

 

2 Maxie’s Hidden Ball Trick

 

2 Lysandre

 

2 Switch

 

1 Computer Search

 

2 Muscle Band

 

Energy: 7

 

4 Double Colorless Energy

 

3 Psychic Energy

 

 

 

Now, as most of you already know what the strategy of night march is, and since this is just night march with some disruption, I am just going to point out some interesting card choices. Super rod is used late game in the case that you have all your night marchers in the discard, and kind of serves like the LTC that was played in night march. The Archeops and Maxie’s with the already high amount of cards like VS Seeker, Trainer’s Mail, Battle Compressor and Ultra Ball pair up very nicely. Stopping evolution is very handy, and can often turn games around. The rest of the list is pretty standard, operating like a normal Night March deck would. Overall, this deck is solid, fast, and provides some crazy disruption, while doing high amounts of damage immediately.

 

 

 

Next up, we have Yvetal. Let’s check out a list:

 

 

 

Pokemon: 12

 

3 Yvetal EX

 

2 Darkrai EX

 

2 Shaymin EX

 

2 Archeops

 

3 Sabeleye

 

Trainers: 37

 

4 Dark Patch

 

4 Battle Compressor

 

2 Maxie’s Hidden Ball Trick

 

4 VS Seeker

 

4 Hypnotoxic Laser

 

2 Virbank City Gym

 

4 Professor Sycamore

 

2 Lysandre

 

1 N

 

4 Ultra Ball

 

1 Computer Search

 

3 Muscle Band

 

1 Max Potion

 

1 Professors Letter

 

Energy: 11

 

4 Double Colorless Energy

 

7 Darkness Energy

 

 

 

Again, it’s a pretty standard deck. Since Yvetal also does not use evolution, partnering it with Archeops makes good sense, and is very potent. The Max Potion seems strange, but I find it very, very good, especially when paired with Y Cyclone or Dark Patch. Other than your Archeops line, this list looks very standard. All the usual trainers, normal energy count, and a good, solid list of Pokémon. I chose to run 3 Sabeleye, which you can take out for pure Yvetal, but I really enjoy the utility Junk Hunt gives. It is just amazing, recycling whatever you need, especially dark patches. Yvetal was dominant, and in expanded I believe it will still be.

 

Next up, we have Seismitoad. Take a look at this basic list:

 

 

 

Pokemon: 8

 

4 Seismitoad EX

 

2 Shaymin EX

 

2 Archeops

 

Trainers: 45

 

4 Ultra Ball

 

4 VS Seeker

 

3 Virbank City Gym

 

4 Hypnotoxic Laser

 

1 Computer Search

 

2 Lysandre

 

4 Professor Sycamore

 

1 Enhanced Hammer

 

4 Crushing Hammer

 

4 Muscle Band

 

2 Head Ringer

 

1 Team Flare Grunt

 

3 N

 

1 AZ

 

1 Colress

 

1 Tool Scrapper

 

2 Maxie’s Hidden Ball Trick

 

1 Switch

 

2 Battle Compressor

 

Energy: 7

 

4 Double Colorless Energy

 

3 Water Energy

 

 

 

This looks like a normal Seismitoad list, and it pretty much is just pure toad plus the six cards for Archeops. The two cards together provide strong, very good disruption. No evolution, No items, huge energy denial/disruption and solid damage (LaserBank + Muscle band + 30 Base = 80). Who would want to play with that? Toad has been a pain to deal with lately, but with Archeops providing even more disruption, it does not look like it’s going anywhere soon. The single switch is in case you get a Shaymin start, otherwise, the list is normal. Staples, draw support, disruption (Flare Grunt/Hammers/Scrapper etc.). Something interesting you can do is put in a few Giratina’s, and a few DDE’s. I would go + 2 Giratina EX + 2 DDE and -1 Colress, Water, AZ and N. Giratina provides a second option, and can be nice, but I prefer pure toad. Disrupting the opponent is certainly powerful, and again, stopping evolution on turn 1 possibly is just mind-blowing. The locks you can create with Archeops are incredible, and in my opinion toad is one of the best.

 

 

 

Obscure, never-going to be used deck time! Pyroar, will you ever be played?

 

 

 

Pokémon:12

 

1 Shaymin EX

 

2 Archeops

 

4 Litleo

 

4 Pyroar

 

1 Suicune

 

Trainers: 36

 

2 Maxie's Hidden Ball Trick

 

3 Battle Compressor

 

4 VS Seeker

 

3 Blacksmith

 

4 Professor Sycamore

 

3 N

 

2 Lysandre

 

1 Computer Search

 

3 Scorched Earth

 

4 Ultra Ball

 

1 Colress

 

2 Switch

 

4 Trainers' Mail

 

Energy: 12

 

8 Fire Energy

 

4 Double Colorless Energy

 

 

 

The idea is to create an invincible Pokémon: Pyroar cannot be damaged by Pokémon who do not evolve, and Archeops stops evolution. You get too make people rage quit because they cannot touch you! (How dare you!) Combine this with energy denial, and you got yourself a nice lock. Then you see Hex Maniac, and your dreams of a perfect deck die, never to be seen again. *sigh* Furthermore, You have to wait turn 2 to play Archeops, so you can evolve Pyroar. Wally does not fix this either, as then you cannot play Maxie’s. Nether less, Pyroar is fun, unexpected, has a few good matchups like Night March and Yvetal, and is the kind of crazy thing that might actually work.

 

 

 

Conclusions

 

 

Archeops is a cool card, and I definitely think it will see tons of play. I have outlined just four of the many decks it could be used in, and in two months I am sure someone is going to come up with some crazy deck that is going to dominate. But Archeops has a bright future, and I think it will stay soaring (Get it, Soaring, Flying type? I’ll stop now). Anyways, stock up on those SR Archeops, and thanks for reading this short article (I promised myself this would be longer, but oh well)

 

First thing to highlight again is Arcehops.

 

 

 

Arcehops' Ability disables, both players from using evolution cards. However, you can bypass this ability using some Tricks --> Hex Maniac and evolve. Setting up a Garboder with evosoda. Putting wobbuffet for 1 turn. Using items and supporters --> Evosoda and Wally. These have been eseentially popular in the standard and expanded which ever decks uses evolutions, except to name some as Seismitoad/Crobats or Pyroars or Crawdaunt decks and other Ability evolutions where people are compelled to evolve from hand, otherwise ability won't work. Ex - Shiftry (Giant Fan). People also don't choose evosoda in the Donphan deck, due to more consistency provided by the Korrinia Supporter (Correct me if spelling is wrong).

 

 

 

Now, some important notes and comments to be observed in the article. To be honest, I would never support the use of Arcehops with Seismitoad and Yveltal. This is because, when you have better options for seismitoad being preferably better, you must not go for this variant, if you want a very good deck. Yveltal's main strategy is attack and it can be dangerous. But, won't it be better when you hit pokemon with OHKOs, so rather than focussing on Archeops, people should prefer laser/banks combo, enhancing a crucial attack.

 

 

 

Now lets see the other 2 decks, which are much more favourable and dangerous and good synergy. Its obvious, that after the ban of Lysandre's Trump card, Flareon Plasma, Vespiqueen and Night March had a high advantage. But they still had one enemy left --> Pyroar. Though nowadays you have Hex Maniac, but Arcehops. This is because, even if the opponent plays hex maniac to evolve pyroars, he is disabling his own ability. Leaving the only and much more preferred choice of playing evosoda. So, Pyroars still have a pack against night march. But, there is another reason, why you can see night march playing Pyroar. The reason is Bats !! They are horribly dangerous to the night march. And arcehops being in play, to enable counters, Bats need to be evolved from hands. So you block one essential enemy ! Playing Hex maniac doesn't solve the issue here as well. Because, hex maniac blocks their ability itself.

 

 

 

To Conclude - Arcehops has provided a fight spirit to counter Bats.

 

 

 

Now lets move to the original and maybe the first made arcehops deck, paired with Pyroar. Of-course, being a correct strategy, the attack is like a wall to basic pokemon, while you are not allowing your opponnet to evolve. Evosoda, wasn't much popular in back days, though arcehops was released in a time, when evosodas did became popular. So, thats just the bad luck. But still packing a surprise, many Pyroar variants still pack a punch. Because in the rein of Mega Pokemons and Shaymins, People don't want to waste space on evosodas, making it less popular in Mega Decks. Making them still exist in the format. But another thing, Hex Maniac is the threat to all. So is Lysandre. Lysandre Arcehops, OHKO, you are done. Since its hard to evolve or put Arcehops on the bench. either you use plume fossil and evolve, or you finish hand out and use Maxie ! Another problem has been new promo tyrantrum EX !!

 

 

 

To Conclude - Being a very good strategy, its fire of compeition has gone down, due to counter cards like Hex Maniac and Tyrantrum EX and evosodas.

Edited by harshu
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pokemasterTz

 

First thing to highlight again is Arcehops.

 

Arcehops' Ability disables, both players from using evolution cards. However, you can bypass this ability using some Tricks --> Hex Maniac and evolve. Setting up a Garboder with evosoda. Putting wobbuffet for 1 turn. Using items and supporters --> Evosoda and Wally. These have been eseentially popular in the standard and expanded which ever decks uses evolutions, except to name some as Seismitoad/Crobats or Pyroars or Crawdaunt decks and other Ability evolutions where people are compelled to evolve from hand, otherwise ability won't work. Ex - Shiftry (Giant Fan). People also don't choose evosoda in the Donphan deck, due to more consistency provided by the Korrinia Supporter (Correct me if spelling is wrong).

 

Now, some important notes and comments to be observed in the article. To be honest, I would never support the use of Arcehops with Seismitoad and Yveltal. This is because, when you have better options for seismitoad being preferably better, you must not go for this variant, if you want a very good deck. Yveltal's main strategy is attack and it can be dangerous. But, won't it be better when you hit pokemon with OHKOs, so rather than focussing on Archeops, people should prefer laser/banks combo, enhancing a crucial attack.

 

Now lets see the other 2 decks, which are much more favourable and dangerous and good synergy. Its obvious, that after the ban of Lysandre's Trump card, Flareon Plasma, Vespiqueen and Night March had a high advantage. But they still had one enemy left --> Pyroar. Though nowadays you have Hex Maniac, but Arcehops. This is because, even if the opponent plays hex maniac to evolve pyroars, he is disabling his own ability. Leaving the only and much more preferred choice of playing evosoda. So, Pyroars still have a pack against night march. But, there is another reason, why you can see night march playing Pyroar. The reason is Bats !! They are horribly dangerous to the night march. And arcehops being in play, to enable counters, Bats need to be evolved from hands. So you block one essential enemy ! Playing Hex maniac doesn't solve the issue here as well. Because, hex maniac blocks their ability ********* Conclude - Arcehops has provided a fight spirit to counter Bats.

 

Now lets move to the original and maybe the first made arcehops deck, paired with Pyroar. Of-course, being a correct strategy, the attack is like a wall to basic pokemon, while you are not allowing your opponnet to evolve. Evosoda, wasn't much popular in back days, though arcehops was released in a time, when evosodas did became popular. So, thats just the bad luck. But still packing a surprise, many Pyroar variants still pack a punch. Because in the rein of Mega Pokemons and Shaymins, People don't want to waste space on evosodas, making it less popular in Mega Decks. Making them still exist in the format. But another thing, Hex Maniac is the threat to all. So is Lysandre. Lysandre Arcehops, OHKO, you are done. Since its hard to evolve or put Arcehops on the bench. either you use plume fossil and evolve, or you finish hand out and use Maxie ! Another problem has been new promo tyrantrum EX !!To Conclude - Being a very good strategy, its fire of compeition has gone down, due to counter cards like Hex Maniac and Tyrantrum EX and evosodas.

Harshu, I disagree with your opinion on yvetal, though I pretty much agree with everything else. In fact, there was a German tournament recently held, and it was the first big expanded tournament, and yvetal archeops took second place!
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Felidae_

Harshu, I disagree with your opinion on yvetal, though I pretty much agree with everything else. In fact, there was a German tournament recently held, and it was the first big expanded tournament, and yvetal archeops took second place!

 

Yeah, winning Japan Nationals, as well as placing 2nd in Würzburg ( alongside 3 other Yveltal Decks in the Top 8 mind you) does give the deck enough credibility to be run.

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Harshu, I disagree with your opinion on yvetal, though I pretty much agree with everything else. In fact, there was a German tournament recently held, and it was the first big expanded tournament, and yvetal archeops took second place!

 

Yeah, winning Japan Nationals, as well as placing 2nd in Würzburg ( alongside 3 other Yveltal Decks in the Top 8 mind you) does give the deck enough credibility to be run.

Well if that is true, sorry for my incorrect opinion put forward. But now as this question has been risen. I would like to learn how this deck would even become sucess. or why is even Arcehops used with Yveltal. I couldn't make out any strategy. So now I would like to learn from you guys !

 

Thanks for teaching me :D

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Felidae_

The reasons behind the archetype are actually quite simple:

 

1. Yveltal can benefit heavily from a loaded discard pile with Dark Patch and Baby Yveltal, thus devoting yourself to discard your entire hand on the first turn in order to get Archeops into play doesn't harm the overall strategy of the deck in any way.

 

2. Keep in mind that both Japan Nationals and the Arena Cup in Würzburg where played after the release of AOR in their respective regions. Having a solution for Vespiqueen, Bats, M-Ray and M-Manectric without sacrificing much space in the deck seems rather feasible.

 

That being said, it is a meta choice never the less and it obviously doesn't do anything in certain match-ups, yet wagering the cost (aka the space in the deck you have to sacrifice for the addition of Maxie and Archeops) against the benefit, it becomes evident that playing this little alteration in the Archetype is a solid option for the current Expanded Metagame.

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The reasons behind the archetype are actually quite simple:

 

1. Yveltal can benefit heavily from a loaded discard pile with Dark Patch and Baby Yveltal, thus devoting yourself to discard your entire hand on the first turn in order to get Archeops into play doesn't harm the overall strategy of the deck in any way.

 

2. Keep in mind that both Japan Nationals and the Arena Cup in Würzburg where played after the release of AOR in their respective regions. Having a solution for Vespiqueen, Bats, M-Ray and M-Manectric without sacrificing much space in the deck seems rather feasible.

 

That being said, it is a meta choice never the less and it obviously doesn't do anything in certain match-ups, yet wagering the cost (aka the space in the deck you have to sacrifice for the addition of Maxie and Archeops) against the benefit, it becomes evident that playing this little alteration in the Archetype is a solid option for the current Expanded Metagame.

Thank you :) Great to learn how it worked !

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PKMNRocker11

I'd like to know the history of the Metagame and how the game has evolved from Base Set to Ancient Origins, if anyone is willing to make an article like that, I'd be forever grateful :D

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pokemasterTz

I'd like to know the history of the Metagame and how the game has evolved from Base Set to Ancient Origins, if anyone is willing to make an article like that, I'd be forever grateful :D

Well, this thread is mainly on specific DECKS, but maybe. But for now I have to work on my new article!

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chickenman2015

Chickenman2015 is now an article writer!

So when someone gives a deck idea I just post that I will review it, then i make, test, tweak, then record my results on here?

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pokemasterTz

So when someone gives a deck idea I just post that I will review it, then i make, test, tweak, then record my results on here?

You can do whatever deck, someone does not have to suggest it, you can just write! Look at my articles for an example.

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chickenman2015

You can do whatever deck, someone does not have to suggest it, you can just write! Look at my articles for an example.

Ok, I'll do that!

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Felidae_

Hope you don't mind me adding this article, if you do feel free to say so and I'll put it down :).

 

 

 

Mienshao, the hidden meta pick

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

 

The state of the Standard format is currently in a somewhat weird spot, as the lack of any major tournaments in the US, as well as the split in Europe tends to prevent any major development.

 

With the lose of a good portion of cards it has furthermore become quite tedious to play, as most decks just feel a bit clumsy and sometimes struggle more with themselves, than with the actual opponent. That being said, occasionally you still have to play Standard never the less, especially on the online client and while the majority of top tier decks are well known to most users, I want to take some time to showcase you one of the decks that usually falls under the radar.

 

 

 

The current Meta Game

 

 

 

Before we can discuss the deck though we first have to take a closer look at the meta game of the current Standard format.

 

Let's first of all answer a particular question that I've heard an enormous amount of times over the years as a competitive TCG player: What is the meta ?

 

 

 

To put it simple, the meta symbolises a certain hierarchy of decks, based on their popularity and win percentage in tournaments. Let's take a fictional tournament with 100 players as an example and say 15 players played deck A, 25 deck B, 10 Deck C, 35 Deck D, 10 Deck E and 5 Deck * to J.

 

 

 

Given this tournament, you can see that both D and B make up 60% of the field, thus it is likely for you to run into one of those decks during your tournament run, way more likely than let' say deck C or E and playing against one of the 1-off decks in slot * to **** almost impossible.

 

 

 

Let's say we have 4 other tournaments with somewhat the same results, then we can establish ourself the earlier glimpse of a meta game.

 

 

 

With those results we can conclude, that an estimated 55 to 65 percent of the field will likely consist of deck D and B, thus while picking our own choice we have to be aware of this. If you have a bad match-up against those popular decks then you should over think your choice carefully, because you are basically trying to sweep through a minefield.

 

 

 

However, keep in mind that popularity in tournaments does not equal win percentage.

 

Let's take a look at the initial mentioned tournament again, though now we focus purely on the top 8.

 

There we find the following results:

 

 

 

1. D

 

2. C

 

3. B

 

4. G

 

5. B

 

6. D

 

7. A

 

8. D

 

 

 

As expected, we find the top meta decks in the top 8 spot as well, however, given that 60% of the players where playing those decks the chance of them re-occurring in the top 8 is quite high.

 

The more important deck in this regard is the found on in the 4th place, deck G.

 

As mentioned earlier, only a single player piloted this deck in the entire tournament, a whopping 1%, way to insignificant to be considered in the brought spectrum of the meta game.

 

However, whereas only 3 out of 35 players in the deck D pool made it into the top 8, a mere 8,5 %, we have a 100% success rate for deck G.

 

 

 

The question is: How did he succeed ?

 

Initially you could argue that it was a fluke, a mere combination of luck, bad draws from the opponents and a certain rogue factor, however luck only carries you so far and reaching the top 8 does usually require more than that.

 

It is more likely that the player had chosen a deck with a favourable match-up against the top meta decks, while ignoring bad ones against the lesser tier decks.

 

To bring this into the perspective of the current Standard meta, lets say the following decks where played in that particular tournament:

 

 

 

A = Night March

 

B = M-Manectric

 

C = Raichu + Bats

 

D = Vespiqueen

 

E = M-Rayquaza

 

* = Giratina + Vileplume

 

G = Mienshao

 

H = Maxie's Lucario

 

I = Wobbuffet + Bats

 

J = M-Tyranitar + Bats

 

 

 

There is no doubt that Vespiqueen and M-Manectric are currently the most played decks in the XY onwards format, as both offer a solid damage output, while being easy to set up and offering a good amount of resistance against most of the field and while both of them can be tackled in various ways, it's safe to say that running either of them in an unknown environment is never a bad choice.

 

 

 

Other popular decks include Night March, Raichu + Bats, M-Rayquaza, Primal Groudon and a couple of other decks, that would usually fill up 3 to 8% of the field, though due to creating a neat example I tried to keep everything rather simple.

 

 

 

 

 

Breaking the Meta: Mienshao

 

 

 

Alright, it's finally time for our deck list:

 

 

 

[bHC] Can't touch this

 

Pokémon - 12

 

 

 

1 Eevee AOR 63

 

3 Hawlucha FFI 63

 

4 Mienfoo FFI 56

 

3 Mienshao FFI 57

 

1 Jolteon AOR 26

 

 

 

Trainer Cards - 40

 

 

 

1 Sacred Ash FLF 96

 

3 Eco Arm AOR 71

 

1 Professor's Letter XY 123

 

4 Level Ball NXD 89

 

4 Robo Substitute Team Flare Gear PHF 102

 

3 Fighting Stadium FFI 90

 

2 Enhanced Hammer PRC 162

 

4 Professor Sycamore XY 122

 

4 Focus Sash FFI 91

 

1 Teammates PRC 160

 

1 Shauna XY 127

 

4 VS Seeker ROS 110

 

2 Muscle Band XY 121

 

2 Lysandre FLF 104

 

4 Korrina FFI 111

 

 

 

Energy - 8

 

 

 

4 Fighting Energy HS 120

 

4 Strong Energy FFI 104

 

 

 

 

 

Mienshao was an archetype that played similar to our good buddy Donphan during the previous season, though never reached the popularity of it's counterpart. The reason for this was quite simple: Whereas Donphan could supply multiple attackers across the board, eventually powering one of them up to Wreck the opponent in the most literal sense of the word, Mienshao was doomed to keep on poking the opponent slowly to death, which wasn't quite ideal. Add a certain dominance for Toad decks and the ability to N your opponent into oblivion and it becomes fairly evident why Mienshao was never a contender in the field.

 

 

 

The XY onwards format has however removed a lot of the previous issues of the archetype and even added an amazing tool to it's arsenal.

 

The general principal of the deck has stayed the same, poking with Mienshao for 40 to 100 damage each turn, while slowly grinding the opponent out and winning the prize trade against Pokemon EX.

 

The most notable addition to the deck is probably Focus Sash and Eco Arm, a card that is usually regarded as mediocre at best.

 

Focus Sash was a dominant factor in Donphan decks in the recent past, as being able to Wreck twice in a row, being somewhat immune to a Lysandre snipe and being able to utilize powerful attackers like Hawlucha without much concern where all good points in favour of the card.

 

Sadly though, in a world of Quacking Punch, Lasers and Bats this was still not enough to bring back the jolly elephant to its former glory days.

 

 

 

Mienshao utilizes the card to it's full potential, as the ability to return him and thus negating all previously dealt damage, combined with Focus Sash can lead to an almost unbeatable fortress.

 

A usual turn might look somewhat like this: bench Mienfoo, attach Focus Sash to him, attack with Mienshao. The opponents attacks for gazzilion points of damage and breaks the Focus Sash.

 

Your turn: bench Mienfoo, evolve the damage Mienfoo and attach an Energy to him. Attach Focus Sash to the bench and proceed.

 

Together with Eco Arm to bring back the Focus Sashes, as well as Robo Substitute, Hawlucha to negate resistance, the occasional Jolteon to boost the damage and running solemnly on non-EX Pokemon all add to the overall strength of the deck.

 

 

 

But what about Bats, Ariados, Megaphone and other cards ?

 

 

 

Glad that you ask, that is the point where the meta game come in handy once again. Mienshao is a deck that isn't meant to be at the top of the food chain, it has several weaknesses that can be exploited easily, but that's the beauty of a meta game deck. As long as you have a favourable match up against the most common decks it is completely fine to play this kind of deck. Yes, occasionally one might run into one bad match after the other, but at the same time you could also breeze through a barrage of Vespiqueen and Manectric decks without breaking a sweat.

 

 

 

That's all for today folks, I hope you liked this little trip into the world of the meta and breaking said thing, see ya next time :).

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pokemasterTz

Hope you don't mind me adding this article, if you do feel free to say so and I'll put it down :).

 

 

 

Mienshao, the hidden meta pick

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

 

The state of the Standard format is currently in a somewhat weird spot, as the lack of any major tournaments in the US, as well as the split in Europe tends to prevent any major development.

 

With the lose of a good portion of cards it has furthermore become quite tedious to play, as most decks just feel a bit clumsy and sometimes struggle more with themselves, than with the actual opponent. That being said, occasionally you still have to play Standard never the less, especially on the online client and while the majority of top tier decks are well known to most users, I want to take some time to showcase you one of the decks that usually falls under the radar.

 

 

 

The current Meta Game

 

 

 

Before we can discuss the deck though we first have to take a closer look at the meta game of the current Standard format.

 

Let's first of all answer a particular question that I've heard an enormous amount of times over the years as a competitive TCG player: What is the meta ?

 

 

 

To put it simple, the meta symbolises a certain hierarchy of decks, based on their popularity and win percentage in tournaments. Let's take a fictional tournament with 100 players as an example and say 15 players played deck A, 25 deck B, 10 Deck C, 35 Deck D, 10 Deck E and 5 Deck * to J.

 

 

 

Given this tournament, you can see that both D and B make up 60% of the field, thus it is likely for you to run into one of those decks during your tournament run, way more likely than let' say deck C or E and playing against one of the 1-off decks in slot * to **** almost impossible.

 

 

 

Let's say we have 4 other tournaments with somewhat the same results, then we can establish ourself the earlier glimpse of a meta game.

 

 

 

With those results we can conclude, that an estimated 55 to 65 percent of the field will likely consist of deck D and B, thus while picking our own choice we have to be aware of this. If you have a bad match-up against those popular decks then you should over think your choice carefully, because you are basically trying to sweep through a minefield.

 

 

 

However, keep in mind that popularity in tournaments does not equal win percentage.

 

Let's take a look at the initial mentioned tournament again, though now we focus purely on the top 8.

 

There we find the following results:

 

 

 

1. D

 

2. C

 

3. B

 

4. G

 

5. B

 

6. D

 

7. A

 

8. D

 

 

 

As expected, we find the top meta decks in the top 8 spot as well, however, given that 60% of the players where playing those decks the chance of them re-occurring in the top 8 is quite high.

 

The more important deck in this regard is the found on in the 4th place, deck G.

 

As mentioned earlier, only a single player piloted this deck in the entire tournament, a whopping 1%, way to insignificant to be considered in the brought spectrum of the meta game.

 

However, whereas only 3 out of 35 players in the deck D pool made it into the top 8, a mere 8,5 %, we have a 100% success rate for deck G.

 

 

 

The question is: How did he succeed ?

 

Initially you could argue that it was a fluke, a mere combination of luck, bad draws from the opponents and a certain rogue factor, however luck only carries you so far and reaching the top 8 does usually require more than that.

 

It is more likely that the player had chosen a deck with a favourable match-up against the top meta decks, while ignoring bad ones against the lesser tier decks.

 

To bring this into the perspective of the current Standard meta, lets say the following decks where played in that particular tournament:

 

 

 

A = Night March

 

B = M-Manectric

 

C = Raichu + Bats

 

D = Vespiqueen

 

E = M-Rayquaza

 

* = Giratina + Vileplume

 

G = Mienshao

 

H = Maxie's Lucario

 

I = Wobbuffet + Bats

 

J = M-Tyranitar + Bats

 

 

 

There is no doubt that Vespiqueen and M-Manectric are currently the most played decks in the XY onwards format, as both offer a solid damage output, while being easy to set up and offering a good amount of resistance against most of the field and while both of them can be tackled in various ways, it's safe to say that running either of them in an unknown environment is never a bad choice.

 

 

 

Other popular decks include Night March, Raichu + Bats, M-Rayquaza, Primal Groudon and a couple of other decks, that would usually fill up 3 to 8% of the field, though due to creating a neat example I tried to keep everything rather simple.

 

 

 

 

 

Breaking the Meta: Mienshao

 

 

 

Alright, it's finally time for our deck list:

 

 

 

[bHC] Can't touch this

 

Pokémon - 12

 

 

 

1 Eevee AOR 63

 

3 Hawlucha FFI 63

 

4 Mienfoo FFI 56

 

3 Mienshao FFI 57

 

1 Jolteon AOR 26

 

 

 

Trainer Cards - 40

 

 

 

1 Sacred Ash FLF 96

 

3 Eco Arm AOR 71

 

1 Professor's Letter XY 123

 

4 Level Ball NXD 89

 

4 Robo Substitute Team Flare Gear PHF 102

 

3 Fighting Stadium FFI 90

 

2 Enhanced Hammer PRC 162

 

4 Professor Sycamore XY 122

 

4 Focus Sash FFI 91

 

1 Teammates PRC 160

 

1 Shauna XY 127

 

4 VS Seeker ROS 110

 

2 Muscle Band XY 121

 

2 Lysandre FLF 104

 

4 Korrina FFI 111

 

 

 

Energy - 8

 

 

 

4 Fighting Energy HS 120

 

4 Strong Energy FFI 104

 

 

 

 

 

Mienshao was an archetype that played similar to our good buddy Donphan during the previous season, though never reached the popularity of it's counterpart. The reason for this was quite simple: Whereas Donphan could supply multiple attackers across the board, eventually powering one of them up to Wreck the opponent in the most literal sense of the word, Mienshao was doomed to keep on poking the opponent slowly to death, which wasn't quite ideal. Add a certain dominance for Toad decks and the ability to N your opponent into oblivion and it becomes fairly evident why Mienshao was never a contender in the field.

 

 

 

The XY onwards format has however removed a lot of the previous issues of the archetype and even added an amazing tool to it's arsenal.

 

The general principal of the deck has stayed the same, poking with Mienshao for 40 to 100 damage each turn, while slowly grinding the opponent out and winning the prize trade against Pokemon EX.

 

The most notable addition to the deck is probably Focus Sash and Eco Arm, a card that is usually regarded as mediocre at best.

 

Focus Sash was a dominant factor in Donphan decks in the recent past, as being able to Wreck twice in a row, being somewhat immune to a Lysandre snipe and being able to utilize powerful attackers like Hawlucha without much concern where all good points in favour of the card.

 

Sadly though, in a world of Quacking Punch, Lasers and Bats this was still not enough to bring back the jolly elephant to its former glory days.

 

 

 

Mienshao utilizes the card to it's full potential, as the ability to return him and thus negating all previously dealt damage, combined with Focus Sash can lead to an almost unbeatable fortress.

 

A usual turn might look somewhat like this: bench Mienfoo, attach Focus Sash to him, attack with Mienshao. The opponents attacks for gazzilion points of damage and breaks the Focus Sash.

 

Your turn: bench Mienfoo, evolve the damage Mienfoo and attach an Energy to him. Attach Focus Sash to the bench and proceed.

 

Together with Eco Arm to bring back the Focus Sashes, as well as Robo Substitute, Hawlucha to negate resistance, the occasional Jolteon to boost the damage and running solemnly on non-EX Pokemon all add to the overall strength of the deck.

 

 

 

But what about Bats, Ariados, Megaphone and other cards ?

 

 

 

Glad that you ask, that is the point where the meta game come in handy once again. Mienshao is a deck that isn't meant to be at the top of the food chain, it has several weaknesses that can be exploited easily, but that's the beauty of a meta game deck. As long as you have a favourable match up against the most common decks it is completely fine to play this kind of deck. Yes, occasionally one might run into one bad match after the other, but at the same time you could also breeze through a barrage of Vespiqueen and Manectric decks without breaking a sweat.

 

 

 

That's all for today folks, I hope you liked this little trip into the world of the meta and breaking said thing, see ya next time :).

Nice Job! Added you!

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PKMNRocker11

Hope you don't mind me adding this article, if you do feel free to say so and I'll put it down :).

 

 

 

Mienshao, the hidden meta pick

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

 

The state of the Standard format is currently in a somewhat weird spot, as the lack of any major tournaments in the US, as well as the split in Europe tends to prevent any major development.

 

With the lose of a good portion of cards it has furthermore become quite tedious to play, as most decks just feel a bit clumsy and sometimes struggle more with themselves, than with the actual opponent. That being said, occasionally you still have to play Standard never the less, especially on the online client and while the majority of top tier decks are well known to most users, I want to take some time to showcase you one of the decks that usually falls under the radar.

 

 

 

The current Meta Game

 

 

 

Before we can discuss the deck though we first have to take a closer look at the meta game of the current Standard format.

 

Let's first of all answer a particular question that I've heard an enormous amount of times over the years as a competitive TCG player: What is the meta ?

 

 

 

To put it simple, the meta symbolises a certain hierarchy of decks, based on their popularity and win percentage in tournaments. Let's take a fictional tournament with 100 players as an example and say 15 players played deck A, 25 deck B, 10 Deck C, 35 Deck D, 10 Deck E and 5 Deck * to J.

 

 

 

Given this tournament, you can see that both D and B make up 60% of the field, thus it is likely for you to run into one of those decks during your tournament run, way more likely than let' say deck C or E and playing against one of the 1-off decks in slot * to **** almost impossible.

 

 

 

Let's say we have 4 other tournaments with somewhat the same results, then we can establish ourself the earlier glimpse of a meta game.

 

 

 

With those results we can conclude, that an estimated 55 to 65 percent of the field will likely consist of deck D and B, thus while picking our own choice we have to be aware of this. If you have a bad match-up against those popular decks then you should over think your choice carefully, because you are basically trying to sweep through a minefield.

 

 

 

However, keep in mind that popularity in tournaments does not equal win percentage.

 

Let's take a look at the initial mentioned tournament again, though now we focus purely on the top 8.

 

There we find the following results:

 

 

 

1. D

 

2. C

 

3. B

 

4. G

 

5. B

 

6. D

 

7. A

 

8. D

 

 

 

As expected, we find the top meta decks in the top 8 spot as well, however, given that 60% of the players where playing those decks the chance of them re-occurring in the top 8 is quite high.

 

The more important deck in this regard is the found on in the 4th place, deck G.

 

As mentioned earlier, only a single player piloted this deck in the entire tournament, a whopping 1%, way to insignificant to be considered in the brought spectrum of the meta game.

 

However, whereas only 3 out of 35 players in the deck D pool made it into the top 8, a mere 8,5 %, we have a 100% success rate for deck G.

 

 

 

The question is: How did he succeed ?

 

Initially you could argue that it was a fluke, a mere combination of luck, bad draws from the opponents and a certain rogue factor, however luck only carries you so far and reaching the top 8 does usually require more than that.

 

It is more likely that the player had chosen a deck with a favourable match-up against the top meta decks, while ignoring bad ones against the lesser tier decks.

 

To bring this into the perspective of the current Standard meta, lets say the following decks where played in that particular tournament:

 

 

 

A = Night March

 

B = M-Manectric

 

C = Raichu + Bats

 

D = Vespiqueen

 

E = M-Rayquaza

 

* = Giratina + Vileplume

 

G = Mienshao

 

H = Maxie's Lucario

 

I = Wobbuffet + Bats

 

J = M-Tyranitar + Bats

 

 

 

There is no doubt that Vespiqueen and M-Manectric are currently the most played decks in the XY onwards format, as both offer a solid damage output, while being easy to set up and offering a good amount of resistance against most of the field and while both of them can be tackled in various ways, it's safe to say that running either of them in an unknown environment is never a bad choice.

 

 

 

Other popular decks include Night March, Raichu + Bats, M-Rayquaza, Primal Groudon and a couple of other decks, that would usually fill up 3 to 8% of the field, though due to creating a neat example I tried to keep everything rather simple.

 

 

 

 

 

Breaking the Meta: Mienshao

 

 

 

Alright, it's finally time for our deck list:

 

 

 

[bHC] Can't touch this

 

Pokémon - 12

 

 

 

1 Eevee AOR 63

 

3 Hawlucha FFI 63

 

4 Mienfoo FFI 56

 

3 Mienshao FFI 57

 

1 Jolteon AOR 26

 

 

 

Trainer Cards - 40

 

 

 

1 Sacred Ash FLF 96

 

3 Eco Arm AOR 71

 

1 Professor's Letter XY 123

 

4 Level Ball NXD 89

 

4 Robo Substitute Team Flare Gear PHF 102

 

3 Fighting Stadium FFI 90

 

2 Enhanced Hammer PRC 162

 

4 Professor Sycamore XY 122

 

4 Focus Sash FFI 91

 

1 Teammates PRC 160

 

1 Shauna XY 127

 

4 VS Seeker ROS 110

 

2 Muscle Band XY 121

 

2 Lysandre FLF 104

 

4 Korrina FFI 111

 

 

 

Energy - 8

 

 

 

4 Fighting Energy HS 120

 

4 Strong Energy FFI 104

 

 

 

 

 

Mienshao was an archetype that played similar to our good buddy Donphan during the previous season, though never reached the popularity of it's counterpart. The reason for this was quite simple: Whereas Donphan could supply multiple attackers across the board, eventually powering one of them up to Wreck the opponent in the most literal sense of the word, Mienshao was doomed to keep on poking the opponent slowly to death, which wasn't quite ideal. Add a certain dominance for Toad decks and the ability to N your opponent into oblivion and it becomes fairly evident why Mienshao was never a contender in the field.

 

 

 

The XY onwards format has however removed a lot of the previous issues of the archetype and even added an amazing tool to it's arsenal.

 

The general principal of the deck has stayed the same, poking with Mienshao for 40 to 100 damage each turn, while slowly grinding the opponent out and winning the prize trade against Pokemon EX.

 

The most notable addition to the deck is probably Focus Sash and Eco Arm, a card that is usually regarded as mediocre at best.

 

Focus Sash was a dominant factor in Donphan decks in the recent past, as being able to Wreck twice in a row, being somewhat immune to a Lysandre snipe and being able to utilize powerful attackers like Hawlucha without much concern where all good points in favour of the card.

 

Sadly though, in a world of Quacking Punch, Lasers and Bats this was still not enough to bring back the jolly elephant to its former glory days.

 

 

 

Mienshao utilizes the card to it's full potential, as the ability to return him and thus negating all previously dealt damage, combined with Focus Sash can lead to an almost unbeatable fortress.

 

A usual turn might look somewhat like this: bench Mienfoo, attach Focus Sash to him, attack with Mienshao. The opponents attacks for gazzilion points of damage and breaks the Focus Sash.

 

Your turn: bench Mienfoo, evolve the damage Mienfoo and attach an Energy to him. Attach Focus Sash to the bench and proceed.

 

Together with Eco Arm to bring back the Focus Sashes, as well as Robo Substitute, Hawlucha to negate resistance, the occasional Jolteon to boost the damage and running solemnly on non-EX Pokemon all add to the overall strength of the deck.

 

 

 

But what about Bats, Ariados, Megaphone and other cards ?

 

 

 

Glad that you ask, that is the point where the meta game come in handy once again. Mienshao is a deck that isn't meant to be at the top of the food chain, it has several weaknesses that can be exploited easily, but that's the beauty of a meta game deck. As long as you have a favourable match up against the most common decks it is completely fine to play this kind of deck. Yes, occasionally one might run into one bad match after the other, but at the same time you could also breeze through a barrage of Vespiqueen and Manectric decks without breaking a sweat.

 

 

 

That's all for today folks, I hope you liked this little trip into the world of the meta and breaking said thing, see ya next time :).

Awesome article, I was looking for a good decklist so thanks for doing this! :D

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chickenman2015

ANTI SHIFTRY DECK




 

I would like to address all the people who dislike shiftry but still want play in the unlimited format. This following deck is basically my counter for shiftry and i have had multiple people concede right away and it can put up with a lot of other decks as well. This deck is basically wobbuffet/bats deck and you can throw in a few ballot(ancient trait) if you wish. The main point is to start with wobbuffet so that your opponent can’t use the ability, “Great Fan”, and so remove all of your Pokemon from the field.



With the amount of people playing shiftry in unlimited these days, it is a fast way to get games. I would say at least three out of ten games will be against a shiftry deck and 99% of them will concede as soon as a wobbeffet gets put in the active spot. Ballots is just insurance incase your wobbafett gets its ability nullified, main reasons getting removed from the active spot by Pokemon Catcher, Pokemon Reversal, Escape Rope, or Lysandre. Also the ability its self could be removed through the use of silent lab.



The bats are there for non shiftry decks. Lets you have the ability to not just beat shiftry decks, but also a lot of other decks by stacking up damage with the bats then using wobbuffets “Psychic Assault” to do large amounts of damage.



The ACE-SPEC of choice was Scoop Up Cyclone, just lets you scoop up any Pokemon and all cards attached and put them into your hand. You can scoop up a heavily damaged Pokemon, get a Shaymin-ex back and use the “Set Up” ability and draw more cards, or get your bats back and stack up more damage.



Deck List:

Pokémon - 19



2 Shaymin-EX ROS

1 Baltoy AOR

4 Wobbuffet PHF

4 Zubat PLS

4 Golbat PHF

4 Crobat PHF



Trainer Cards - 34



2 Ultra Ball

2 Professor Juniper(Porfessor Sycamore would be a good substitute)

3 Level Ball

2 Switch

3 Professor Oak's New Theory(Professor Birch's Observations or Shauna would be a good substitute)

3 Super Scoop Up

1 Scoop Up Cyclone(AZ, a fourth Super Scoop UP, or Cassius would be a good substitute)

4 VS Seeker

4 N

4 Dimension Valley

2 Repeat Ball

3 Muscle Band(swapping one or two Muscle Bands out for Silver Bangle would be a good idea)

1 Lysandre(Pokemon Catcher would be a good substitute)



Energy - 7



7 Psychic Energy



Total Cards - 60

Edited by chickenman2015
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PKMNRocker11

I like the idea but I just think that you're not using Unlimited in the most fruitful way. I mean there are a lot of cards you could use like Junk Arm etc that'd be really useful and that is available in the format exclusively. But other than that, this is a great Counter. Also maybe your article could be a bit longer :P

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chickenman2015

I like the idea but I just think that you're not using Unlimited in the most fruitful way. I mean there are a lot of cards you could use like Junk Arm etc that'd be really useful and that is available in the format exclusively. But other than that, this is a great Counter. Also maybe your article could be a bit longer :P

Haha sorry about the shortness. Im kinda bad about writing long things and I'm very tired but thanks for the input! :)

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pokemasterTz

 

ANTI SHIFTRY DECK

 

 

 

I would like to address all the people who dislike shiftry but still want play in the unlimited format. This following deck is basically my counter for shiftry and i have had multiple people concede right away and it can put up with a lot of other decks as well. This deck is basically wobbuffet/bats deck and you can throw in a few ballot(ancient trait) if you wish. The main point is to start with wobbuffet so that your opponent can’t use the ability, “Great Fan”, and so remove all of your Pokemon from the field.

 

 

 

With the amount of people playing shiftry in unlimited these days, it is a fast way to get games. I would say at least three out of ten games will be against a shiftry deck and 99% of them will concede as soon as a wobbeffet gets put in the active spot. Ballots is just insurance incase your wobbafett gets its ability nullified, main reasons getting removed from the active spot by Pokemon Catcher, Pokemon Reversal, Escape Rope, or Lysandre. Also the ability its self could be removed through the use of silent lab.

 

 

 

The bats are there for non shiftry decks. Lets you have the ability to not just beat shiftry decks, but also a lot of other decks by stacking up damage with the bats then using wobbuffets “Psychic Assault” to do large amounts of damage.

 

 

 

The ACE-SPEC of choice was Scoop Up Cyclone, just lets you scoop up any Pokemon and all cards attached and put them into your hand. You can scoop up a heavily damaged Pokemon, get a Shaymin-ex back and use the “Set Up” ability and draw more cards, or get your bats back and stack up more damage.

 

 

 

Deck List:

 

Pokémon - 19

 

 

 

2 Shaymin-EX ROS

 

1 Baltoy AOR

 

4 Wobbuffet PHF

 

4 Zubat PLS

 

4 Golbat PHF

 

4 Crobat PHF

 

 

 

Trainer Cards - 34

 

 

 

2 Ultra Ball

 

2 Professor Juniper(Porfessor Sycamore would be a good substitute)

 

3 Level Ball

 

2 Switch

 

3 Professor Oak's New Theory(Professor Birch's Observations or Shauna would be a good substitute)

 

3 Super Scoop Up

 

1 Scoop Up Cyclone(AZ, a fourth Super Scoop UP, or Cassius would be a good substitute)

 

4 VS Seeker

 

4 N

 

4 Dimension Valley

 

2 Repeat Ball

 

3 Muscle Band(swapping one or two Muscle Bands out for Silver Bangle would be a good idea)

 

1 Lysandre(Pokemon Catcher would be a good substitute)

 

 

 

Energy - 7

 

 

 

7 Psychic Energy

 

 

 

Total Cards - 60

 

Hey! this kind of thing belongs more in the Best Decks in the TCG! might want to move it there  :)

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chickenman2015

Hey! this kind of thing belongs more in the Best Decks in the TCG! might want to move it there  :)

Haha ok, still trying to figure it out, i could use a little more explaining if you want to P me :)

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